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Jeff Gill Reappointed as Editor in Chief of Political Analysis

Betsy Sinclair, SPM President
R. Michael Alvarez, SPM Vice President and President Elect

We are pleased to announce that Jeff Gill, Distinguished Professor, Department of Government and Department of Mathematics & Statistics, American University, has agreed to continue serving as Editor in Chief of Political Analysis.  Jeff’s reappointment...

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An Open Collection of Political Science Research with OLS Models and Cross-Sectional Data

An Open Collection of Political Science Research with OLS Models and Cross-Sectional Data.

Joshua Alley

Department of Politics, University of Virginia

Finding accessible and interesting examples and material for exercises is a common teaching challenge in political science, especially in research methods classes. Introductory courses in political science research methods often cover ordinary least squares (OLS) models in cross-sectional data. Locating examples from...

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Neal Beck: 50 Years of Political Methodology and Some Suggestions for the Near Future

Last month (March 17, 2021-March 19, 2021) the University of Hamburg hosted PolMeth Europe 2021.  This virtual conference represents the first European PolMeth --- and as a participant in PolMeth Europe 2021, I'll say that it was an excellent methods conference.  There were a large number of really interesting and exciting methods papers presented during the conference, as well as some fun opportunities to interact and network informally.

One of the most...

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The Second Joint Meeting of the Asian Political Methodology group and the Australian Society for Quantitative Political Science (AsianPolmeth VIII & ASQPS IX)

By Kentaro Fukumoto, Professor, Gakushuin University (Kentaro.Fukumoto@gakushuin.ac.jp)

Last winter, we canceled the seventh Asian Political Methodology Meeting in Hong Kong due to the political situation. This winter, we had a worldwide pandemic on our hands. Nevertheless, we must continue the momentum that we have built since the first AsianPolmeth meeting in 2014. Thus, we held the second joint meeting of the Asian Political Methodology group and the Australian Society for Quantitative...

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Measuring Aggregate Policy Priorities of the U.S. House of Representatives

By Philip D. Waggoner, University of Chicago

Abstract: Tracing individual policy priorities through bill sponsorship is a relatively common occurrence in policy research. Yet, do individual priorities translate to institutional priorities? I address this by offering a statistical approach to measuring and mapping the policy priorities of the U.S. House of Representatives over the post-war period. Assuming individually sponsored bills are reflections of individual legislators’ priorities, and thus aggregate sponsored bills...

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The Political Methodologist Updates

Some of you may have been wondering what has happened to your favorite society publication, The Political Methodologist!

Well, it's back under temporary editorship, and we are happy to consider submissions!  For the time being, Society for Political Methodology Publications Committee chair Michael Alvarez (i.e., me) is serving as temporary editor.  As many of you know, at one point in the very distant past I edited TPM (and then co-edited Political Analysis with Jonathan Katz for a bit).  Send submissions or ideas for submissions directly to rmichaelalvarez@...

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Pandemic teaching and research: A few simple tips to improve video streaming quality

By Justin Esarey

While this isn’t normally a subject I’d cover in The Political Methodologist, I’ve noticed that many people (students and professors alike) are having trouble with live streaming video interruptions during their videoconference meetings. I’m sure some of you have experienced this as well. Given that most people around the world are “sheltering in place” and doing their work via telecommuting, I thought it might be helpful to post some tips on how to improve your experience.

If you’re having trouble with videoconferencing, the problem...

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But Shouldn’t That Work Against Me?

By Anthony Fowler

The refrain is ubiquitous in seminars, workshops, and the discussion sections of quantitative studies. An audience member or reviewer might raise one of the following objections:

  • The purported effect/mechanism seems implausible.
  • It seems unlikely that your design could detect the effect/mechanism of interest.
  • Your estimates are likely biased toward zero.

The common, often enthusiastic retorts are the subject of this essay:

  • But shouldn’t that work against me?
  • ...
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Utilizing Javascript in Qualtrics for Survey Experimental Designs

By Justin de Benedictis-Kessner

Experiments have undeniably increased in their use within political science in the last twenty years (Druckman et al., 2006). Especially frequent in this rise of experimental research is the survey experiment. Survey experiments are an effective method for exploiting random assignment to determine accurate causal effects while keeping the costs of research low and the speed with which data can be collected short (Mullinix et al., 2015). Moreover, survey experiments are a research methodology that can be accessible and open to many: students...

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The 2019 Asian Political Methodology Meeting

By Kentaro Fukumoto

[This post was contributed by Kentaro Fukumoto, Professor of Political Science at Gakushuin University.]

We held the joint conference of the 6th Asian Political Methodology Meeting and the second annual meeting of the Japanese Society for Quantitative Political Science at Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan, on January 5 and 6, 2019. We have a small, intensive conference focusing on innovative quantitative methods and their applications. Although the conference seeks to...

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